More Infrared Shots with Fisheye Lenses

I was out all day yesterday with a stack of cameras and the Sigma 4.5mm and 10mm fisheye lenses
With a pile of cameras to test I decided to get out of Melbourne for some country time. So a drive out to the North West of Melbourne took me into a variety of country, from rough native tree areas to farmland and pine plantations.

Below are shots taken with mainly the 10mm fisheye, but also one with the 4.5mm circular fisheye. The shots were taken with my infrared converted Canon 350D (Rebel XT).

The 10mm fisheye takes some getting used to. By that I mean you need to get used to the lens’ distortions. Vertical edges, like trees, will strongly bow in top and bottom. So in some shots the fisheye nature will be quite obvious, in others much less so. In many images it shows a slight, bluish (on my camera) hotspot in the center, but it is not always there and I suspect it is a lens flare issue rather than a true IR hotspot. I have to do more testing to be clear on this.

The 4.5mm lens is a tough one to use. With a 180 degree field of view you either get the sun in the image or your own shadow (and feet and stomach :). I haven’t yet shot in low light. One side effect of this is that I’ve normally had the sun in the shot. This makes it impossible to get the foliage light as I would like. So from an IR perspective it makes it a challenge. On the other hand the results are certainly spectacular.

I’ll be publishing the visible light results with these lenses shortly.

Infrared fisheye images

Infrared fisheye images

Infrared fisheye images

Infrared fisheye images

Infrared fisheye images

Infrared fisheye images

Infrared fisheye images

Infrared fisheye images

The other infrared fisheye images are in the articles here and here.

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